install theme
Apr 17, 2014

(Source: bindweeds, via n7commander)

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Apr 17, 2014

owligator:

kikiyuyu:

I like to imagine Shepard won’t let him on the ship like that so she makes him stand outside while she hoses him down

omg tho

(Source: mcjoni15, via madamebadger)

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Apr 17, 2014
boujhetto:




Man’s best friend

I like how he picks him up and is all, “There you go!”

fucked his shit up

LMMFAOOOOO

boujhetto:

Man’s best friend

I like how he picks him up and is all, “There you go!”

fucked his shit up

LMMFAOOOOO

(Source: zennmaister, via bennydict-cabbagepatch)

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Apr 17, 2014

'Do not lost hope'
'Please stay strong a little bit more'
‘We are waiting’
‘Please comeback’
'Are you Hungry ?'

#PrayForSouthKorea

(Source: kai-laydoscope, via amaterasuai)

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Apr 17, 2014

bearsnbeetsnbattlestargalactica:

This was seriously the best prank

(Source: crocs5evabruh, via amaterasuai)

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Apr 17, 2014
Ñ oomshi:

canada is too wild

oomshi:

canada is too wild

(Source: pussysista, via reallyawkwardblackguy)

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Apr 17, 2014
relahvant:

fuchsimeon:

beccabummie:

all-four-cheekbones:

oldfuckingsport:

iminmypants:

mlletimelord:

castielcampbell:

death-limes:

muffinass:

and in that moment, the entire movie theater burst into tears

i think this was the moment that made most of us despise umbridge more than voldemort

most of us?! don’t you mean ALL of us?? I don’t think even Voldemort liked this bitch!

No one likes Umbridge.

I heard, one time, a dementor kissed her and IT died

Voldemort committed genocide, but Umbridge dared to be female while she abused her power. 

The point isn’t that Umbridge was worse than Voldemort; it’s that everyone hates her more. And I think it has nothing to do with her being a woman and everything with being the sort of cruel most of us have actually experienced.
I mean, look at Voldemort. He’s basically Wizard Hitler, which is, obviously, an incredibly terrible thing to be. But most people—especially the younger people in Harry Potter’s target audience—have not had their parents murdered by a xenophobic cult leader. Nor have they fought for their lives against giant snakes, been kidnapped for dark rituals, or watched numerous friends die in front of them. Voldemort’s crimes are numerous, but they’re distant and fantastical, like hearing about a serial killer on the news.
But they have had that one teacher who inflicts extra punishments just because they don’t like you. They’ve complained to parents and authorities only to be ignored. They’ve sat through pointless classes and been silenced when they criticize. Umbridge is that teacher we all hated because she made our lives miserable and we were powerless to stop her. And as we grow out of school, there are still people in positions of power who act like her. The manager who denies your schedule requests and penalizes you for invented infractions. That customer who complains to corporate because their scam didn’t work, and the corporate decision to listen to their story. Cops performing illegal searches because they know you don’t have any proof.
Yes, torturing and killing numerous people is worse than terrorizing a handful of schoolchildren, but Voldemort is the bad guy in a fairy tale. Umbridge is personal.

*drops the mic*

Voldemort is the villain we never hope to face.
Umbridge is the villain we face every day.

thank you all-four-cheekbones some people on this website need to realise not everything is a matter of sexism or gender discrimination omg

relahvant:

fuchsimeon:

beccabummie:

all-four-cheekbones:

oldfuckingsport:

iminmypants:

mlletimelord:

castielcampbell:

death-limes:

muffinass:

and in that moment, the entire movie theater burst into tears

i think this was the moment that made most of us despise umbridge more than voldemort

most of us?! don’t you mean ALL of us?? I don’t think even Voldemort liked this bitch!

No one likes Umbridge.

I heard, one time, a dementor kissed her and IT died

Voldemort committed genocide, but Umbridge dared to be female while she abused her power. 

The point isn’t that Umbridge was worse than Voldemort; it’s that everyone hates her more. And I think it has nothing to do with her being a woman and everything with being the sort of cruel most of us have actually experienced.

I mean, look at Voldemort. He’s basically Wizard Hitler, which is, obviously, an incredibly terrible thing to be. But most people—especially the younger people in Harry Potter’s target audience—have not had their parents murdered by a xenophobic cult leader. Nor have they fought for their lives against giant snakes, been kidnapped for dark rituals, or watched numerous friends die in front of them. Voldemort’s crimes are numerous, but they’re distant and fantastical, like hearing about a serial killer on the news.

But they have had that one teacher who inflicts extra punishments just because they don’t like you. They’ve complained to parents and authorities only to be ignored. They’ve sat through pointless classes and been silenced when they criticize. Umbridge is that teacher we all hated because she made our lives miserable and we were powerless to stop her. And as we grow out of school, there are still people in positions of power who act like her. The manager who denies your schedule requests and penalizes you for invented infractions. That customer who complains to corporate because their scam didn’t work, and the corporate decision to listen to their story. Cops performing illegal searches because they know you don’t have any proof.

Yes, torturing and killing numerous people is worse than terrorizing a handful of schoolchildren, but Voldemort is the bad guy in a fairy tale. Umbridge is personal.

*drops the mic*

Voldemort is the villain we never hope to face.

Umbridge is the villain we face every day.

thank you all-four-cheekbones some people on this website need to realise not everything is a matter of sexism or gender discrimination omg

(Source: phoebebuffay, via bennydict-cabbagepatch)

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Apr 17, 2014
Ñ tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(via bennydict-cabbagepatch)

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Apr 17, 2014
Ñ katzmatt:

seeyainanotherlife:

cassandrugs:

tseecka:

samandriel:

dajo42:

“Can I touch your butt” in Elvish.

This is so useful

No, this is not “Can I touch your butt” in Elvish. This is “Can I touch your butt?” in English, transcribed using the letters of the Elvish alphabet. There is a difference. 
In Elvish, the letters of the alphabet correspond to sounds, not to words. The above text spells it out using one symbol to represent one letter of the original English, which is incorrect:
c-a-n  i  t-o-u-c-h  y-o-u-r  b-u-t-t
If you really want to spell out an English phrase using the Elvish alphabet, you would do so phonetically, which would basically equate to one symbol per phoneme (sound):
c-a-n  a-i  t-u-ch  y-o-r  b-u-t
If you actually wanted to write “Can I touch your butt?” in Elvish, one (very rough) translation would be:

Annog nin daf pladan tele ci?

Which, in Sindarin Elvish, roughly translates to, “Would you give me permission to touch your rear?”
Written in tengwar (the Elvish alphabet), it would look like this:

Sorry for the blurry quality.

damn, the lotr fandom doesnt fuck around

wow

not to mention LOOK HOW POLITE THIS WAS 
LIKE GOOD LORD 
OLDEST FANDOMS REALLY ARE POLITEST 

katzmatt:

seeyainanotherlife:

cassandrugs:

tseecka:

samandriel:

dajo42:

“Can I touch your butt” in Elvish.

This is so useful

No, this is not “Can I touch your butt” in Elvish. This is “Can I touch your butt?” in English, transcribed using the letters of the Elvish alphabet. There is a difference. 

In Elvish, the letters of the alphabet correspond to sounds, not to words. The above text spells it out using one symbol to represent one letter of the original English, which is incorrect:

  • c-a-n  i  t-o-u-c-h  y-o-u-r  b-u-t-t

If you really want to spell out an English phrase using the Elvish alphabet, you would do so phonetically, which would basically equate to one symbol per phoneme (sound):

  • c-a-n  a-i  t-u-ch  y-o-r  b-u-t

If you actually wanted to write “Can I touch your butt?” in Elvish, one (very rough) translation would be:

  • Annog nin daf pladan tele ci?

Which, in Sindarin Elvish, roughly translates to, “Would you give me permission to touch your rear?”

Written in tengwar (the Elvish alphabet), it would look like this:

image

Sorry for the blurry quality.

damn, the lotr fandom doesnt fuck around

wow

not to mention LOOK HOW POLITE THIS WAS 

LIKE GOOD LORD 

OLDEST FANDOMS REALLY ARE POLITEST 

(Source: dajo42, via bennydict-cabbagepatch)

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^
è